Statement on Educational Effectiveness

2017 and 2016 Educational Effectiveness

Oblate School of Theology is accredited by the Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada to award the Master of Divinity, Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry, Master of Arts (Theology), Master of Arts (Spirituality), Ph.D. in Spirituality, and Doctor of Ministry degrees. Approved for a Comprehensive Distance Education Program.


Degrees Conferred 

MDiv

MA (professional)

MA (academic)

DMin

STB

 

Hon. Doct.

May 2017

7

6

8

1

-

 

2

May 2016

17

4

6

2

1

 

2


 

Completion Rate

Master of Divinity = 70%

Master of Arts = 27%

This number is not representative of the actual rate at which MA students complete the program. It reflects the number of students who complete the program in two years, which is considered full time. Since almost all of the students in these programs are part-time, they usually complete the program in four to five years.

Over the past four years, the percentage of admitted students who complete the MA program is 95%.

This number better demonstrates the graduation rate of the part-time student population that is the greater portion of these programs.


Placement Rate:

Since most of those who come to OST are either preparing for ordination or already in ministry, the placement rate is near 100%.


Educational Debt:

85.7 % of the 2017 graduates and 82.1 % of the 2016 graduates indicated that they accrued no educational debt while completing their degree programs at OST.


Religious Tradition

90.9% of the 2017 graduates and 89.3% of the 2016 graduates were Roman Catholics. Christians from other traditions include African Methodist Episcopal, Baptist, Pentecostal, and Non-Denominational Churches.


Educational Contexts

OST offers courses in both online and face-to-face formats. The percentages below indicate how students received course input:

Attended:

traditional day classes

evening classes on campus

intensive on campus classes

online only

hybrid: face-to-face and online

2017

39.5%

27.9%

11.6%

4.7%

16.3%

2016

39.3%

23.2%

21.4%

7.1%

8.9%


OST uses the Graduating Student Questionnaire (GSQ) of the Association of Theological Schools as one means of determining student satisfaction and achievement. The responses below provide an indication of how effective OST was in providing the skills needed for ministry.

 

Responses to Graduating Student Questionnaire (GSQ) of The Association of Theological Schools

in 2017 by 22 graduates

in 2016 by 28/30 graduates:

 

Graduates were asked to assess the school’s educational effectiveness in facilitating twenty (20) skill areas by rating each on a scale of 1-5, where 1=not at all effective, 2= not very effective, 3=somewhat effective, 4=effective, and 5=very effective.

The highest rated areas were:

Ratings:  2017 Graduates Skills
4.6 Ability to interact effectively with those from cultural and racial/ethnic contexts other than my own
4.6 Ability to work effectively with my own religious tradition
4.5 Awareness and appreciation of the globalized context in which ministry is practiced
4.5 Ability to work with both women and men
4.5 Ability to relate social issues to faith
4.5 Ability to think theologically
Ratings:   2016 Graduates Skills
4.6 Ability to think theologically
4.5 Ability to work effectively with both women and men
4.5 Awareness and appreciation of the globalized context in which ministry is practiced
4.5 Ability to interact effectively with those from cultural and racial/ethnic contexts other than my own
4.4 Ability to relate social issues to faith

The lowest areas rated were:

Ratings:   2017 Graduates Skills
3.7 Knowledge of church polity/canon law
3.8 Ability to administer a parish
Ratings:   2016 Graduates
3.9 Ability to lead others
3.8 Ability to administer a parish

All other skills were rated 4.0 or higher.

Note that not every degree program requires the same level of competency in all the skill areas. For example, MA students generally would not be preparing to lead a parish, but MDiv students would.

The GSQ also asks graduates to rate the Level of Satisfaction with School’s Services and Academic Resources in twenty-five (25) areas using the following scale:

1 – Very dissatisfied; 2 – Somewhat dissatisfied; 3 – Neutral; 4 – Satisfied; 5 – Very satisfied

Twelve of the twenty-five (25) categories listed were scored at 4.0 or higher. The lowest was 2.6, Childcare.

The highest areas were:

Ratings: 2017 Graduates
4.7 Access to library collection
4.4 Adequacy of library collection
4.3 Class size
4.2 Quality of teaching
4.2 Accessibility of administrative/staff support
4.2 Academic advising

 

Thirteen of the twenty-five (25) categories listed were scored at 4.0 or higher. The lowest was 2.9, Child care.

The highest areas were:

Ratings: 2016 Graduates  
4.7 Class size
4.5 Access to library collection
4.5 Upkeep of campus
4.4 Accessibility of faculty
4.4 Quality of teaching
4.4 Adequacy of library collection